How can you help our nonprofit send care packages to some of the most remote of the roughly 225,000 U.S. military troops serving overseas in 2016?

1) Donate Financially - Our greatest need is cash for our mailing costs. With no paid staff, we strive to maximize the use of donations. We are a 501(c)(3) charity, so your gifts are tax deductible. We accept checks to Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas, P.O. Box 116691, Carrollton, TX 75011. You can donate via our mobile website - m.airborneangelcadets.com, or via credit card through our Click and Pledge account.

2) Donate Goods - Our all-volunteer charity is based in the Dallas area, but receives product donations from across the USA for care packages for our Soldiers and Troops overseas. We kindly request that you contact us at support@airborneangelcadets.com before sending any care package goods.

Care Package banner

Care Package banner

Rock & Brews

5/05/2016

10% of fundraising goal has been reached after first 4 months of 2016

With 4 months gone by in 2016, the Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas have raised about $14,000 (10%) of our $140,000 fundraising goal for 2016.  We are extremely grateful for those who have assisted us early in 2016.  We still have about $126,000 to raise in 2016.

The largest expense of our all-volunteer nonprofit is our USPS postage costs. We do not have free military transport for our care packages.  In January alone this year, our postage costs were over $7,000.  If you are looking for an opportunity to support our U.S. military troops in Iraq, Afghanistan and other remote areas overseas with care packages, we would greatly appreciate your financial support. Thanks.

5/04/2016

Candy Donation Received From Dolores and Donald of Rockford, Illinois.

Thank you Dolores and Donald for your donation of candy for the troops. We'll be sure to include the goodies in our next shipment of care packages to the Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines in Afghanistan, Iraq, Africa and the Mideast. The bags of Lifesavers, Brach's Candy, Cinnamon and Butterscotch Hard Candy will bring a much needed "taste" of home to the men and women who are serving our country far from home.
These bags of candy will bring a "taste" of home to the U.S. Troops deployed overseas.
We greatly appreciate the support of all the individuals, organizations and businesses who help us ship care packages to our military serving overseas. There are many ways you can help; you can send requested items to us to be included in the care packages, donate funds through the Click and Pledge link at the top of the page or send checks made payable to: Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas, P.O. Box 116691, Carrollton, TX 75011.

5/03/2016

'I think we need to say that clearly' - U.S. Sec'y of Defense Ash Carter

News this week that a Navy Seal was killed by enemy gunfire in Iraq is a serious reminder that thousands of U.S. troops are deployed in dangerous areas.  Whether it's called an 'advise and assist' or 'combat' mission, it is still a dangerous mission.

From the Wall Street Journal, May 3, 2016:
"It is a combat death, of course,” (U.S. Sec'y of Defense Ash Carter) said. “And a very sad loss.”

In testimony to the U.S. Senate last week, the defense secretary affirmed that American troops were in combat, despite the White House’s emphasis on their advise-and-assist capacity. “I think we need to say that clearly,” he said.

A U.S. service member helping Kurdish fighters near the northern Iraqi city of Mosul was killed during an attack by Islamic State forces on Tuesday, underscoring the risks U.S. forces face even as they seek to limit their military involvement in the country.

(The Obama Administration) describes the deployment in Iraq as an 'advise-and-assist' mission. But Tuesday’s incident highlighted how even that strategy entails a significant level of danger for American troops.


In March of this year, a U.S. Marine was killed, and 8 others wounded, by a rocket attack in Iraq.

The Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas continue to ship care packages to our U.S. Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines serving in remote areas overseas.

Civilians try MRE's for the first time!

Below is a fun and informative video of civilians eating military MRE's (Meals Ready to Eat) for the first time. While MRE's have improved over the years, we still receive lots of requests from U.S. troops deployed overseas for microwavable meals.  If troops are at locations that don't have dining facilities, or miss the normal dining hours, or are too busy working to walk a long distance to the dining hall, they like the convenience of eating Hormel Compleats, Barilla Ready Meals, Velveeta Cheesy Skillets, or other microwavable meals.  The Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas like to include many of these microwavable meals in our soldiers care packages.

5/02/2016

5K or 10K Military Fun Run - Walk for the Troops!

We know the the good people in the Dallas - Fort Worth area love to run and walk for charitable causes.  We would greatly appreciate any business or organization who could host a 5K or 10K Fun Run or Walk for our U.S. Military Troops deployed overseas ... and help us ship care care packages to them.

Our all-volunteer nonprofit, the Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas, sends care packages year round to American Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines serving in our Armed Forces overseas. If you are able to organize such a charitable race or walk, and are looking for a worthy beneficiary, we would be grateful for your support of our U.S. military troops overseas.

4/28/2016

Allstate's "Bring out the Good" Campaign

One of our "Angels" was featured in a company news letter at Allstate. Here's an excerpt:

 Imagine being out in the middle of nowhere and needing toothpaste or new socks. That happens every day to American men and women serving abroad in harm’s way. Joycelyn S., an ABO Operations Support team member at the Irving campus volunteers with Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas, a nonprofit that ships care packages to troops in remote areas overseas.

Donated goods and financial support enable Joycelyn and her fellow volunteers to hold packing parties every six to eight weeks. “We ship about 2,700 care packages to 12,000 troops every year,” she said. Items regularly shipped include body wash, lip balm, twin sheets, phone cards, batteries, nuts, peanut butter, coffee and beef jerky. “We’ve also sent power drills and microwaves,” said Joycelyn.

Joycelyn prepares the shipping labels and makes sure information is correct for Customs. She has been involved with Airborne Angel Cadets of Texas for eight years and volunteers 10 hours a month. The organization, which has no paid staff, was founded in 2005 when a flight attendant met a young soldier on his way to Iraq. Hearing the soldier’s family did not have the resources to send him care packages made a strong impact on the flight attendant.